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Chili and Curry

Tasty, nutritious, and economical. Who could ask for more?

Chili

1 can tomatoes
1 can Kidney beans (pre-cooked)
1-2 carrots, chopped
1 can corn (try the non sweetened variety)
1 onion
1 tsp olive oil or coconut oil
Any additional vegetables you want to add. Peppers are nice.
Add chillies to make it spicy.

Spices:
2.5 tbsp Cumin
1 tbsp Coriander
1 tbsp Turmeric
1 tbsp Chilli powder (mild or hot, as you prefer)

Stir fry onion and carrots in oil. Add all other ingredients. Simmer for 45 minutes. Serve over brown basmati rice or quinoa. Top with cheese if you like.
Note: you can also add mince to this for a nice meaty version.

Curry

1 can tomatoes
1 can chickpeas
1 can/package coconut milk
1 carrot
1 onion
1 tsp olive oil or coconut oil
1 cup peas
Any additional vegetables you want to add.

Spices:
1 tbsp Cumin
2.5 tbsp Coriander (or 1/2 cup if using fresh herb)
1 tbsp Turmeric
1 tbsp curry paste or powder
1-2 cloves garlic (per taste, optional)

Stir fry onion and carrots in oil. Add all other ingredients and simmer for 45 minutes. Serve over brown basmati rice or quinoa.
Note: you can also add chicken to this.

Ingredients

The ingredients between these 2 dishes are very similar, and keep well. The Mediterranean Market in Westside is a good source for inexpensive spices, which can be stored in the freezer to keep them fresh.


Why Chili and Curry?

Both of these dishes are lovely and warming and full of flavour, and full of therapeutic benefit.

    • Tomatoes – contains Lycopene, a powerful carotenoid and anti-oxidant. The amount of lycopene increases with cooking, so including in this slow cooked stew is perfect. High in Vitamin C and A, tomatoes also contain 18 other vitamins and minerals.
    • Kidney Beans – this high fibre food is great for lowering cholesterol and balancing blood sugar levels. High in molybdenum, this trace element is needed to detoxify sulfites (a preservative that many people have a reaction to). Kidney beans are also high in folate, tryptophan, manganese and iron.
    • Carrots – high in vitamin A in the form of carotenoids, an anti-oxidant which helps tp protect against heart disease and cancer, and promotes good night vision. Its good for blood sugar levels, colon health, and lung health.
    • Onion – high in chromium and fibre, onions can help to balance blood sugar levels. It’s a sulphur containing compounds (like garlic) which are great for lowering cholesterol and protecting against many common cancers. Also high in vitamin C, its great for your immune system.
    • Chickpeas – a great source of protein, fibre, folate and magnesium, great for lowering cholesterol. Did you know that magnesium is a ‘calcium-channel blocker’? Its also very high in the trace mineral manganese, an important co-factor in energy and anti-oxidant production.
    • Cumin – a source of iron, it is also good for digestion by stimulating pancreatic enzymes.
    • Coriander – rich in phytonutrients, coriander (also called cilantro) is very healing, promoting balanced blood sugar levels and control of cholesterol, as well as providing anti-microbial properties. It’s a great source of fibre, iron, manganese and magnesium.
    • Turmeric – this powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant adds the typical yellow colour to curry dishes, and has a peppery and slightly bitter flavour. High in manganese, iron and vitamin B6, it has numerous health benefits for any issue caused by inflammation and oxidative damage.
    • Garlic - a strong anti-bacterial and anti-microbial, this food strengthens the immune system and helps to fight off coughs, colds and sinus issues.